Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

November 23 2017

13:54
1133 b591 390

dappermouth:

strange omens gather at the end of the street

Reposted fromforgetaboutit forgetaboutit vialordminx lordminx

November 15 2017

fbr
21:41
futurismus
Reposted fromTokei-Ihto Tokei-Ihto viasofias sofias

November 06 2017

10:34

princesspotpourri:

some-triangles:

blurds:

Terry Pratchett started his career as a crypto-monarchist and ended up the most consistently humane writer of his generation.  He never entirely lost his affection for benevolent dictatorship, and made a few classic colonial missteps along the way, but in the end you’d be hard pressed to find a more staunchly feminist, anti-racist, anti-classist, unsentimental and clear-sighted writer of Old White British Fantasy.  

The thing I love about Terry’s writing is that he loved - loved - civil society.  He loved the correct functioning of the social contract.  He loved technology, loved innovation, but also loved nature and the ways of living that work with and through it.   He loved Britain, but hated empire (see “Jingo”) - he was a ruralist who hated provincialism, a capitalist who hated wealth, an urbanist who reveled in stories of pollution, crime and decay.  He was above all a man who loved systems, of nature, of thought, of tradition and of culture.  He believed in the best of humanity and knew that we could be even better if we just thought a little more.

As a writer: how skillful, how prolific, how consistent.  The yearly event of a new Discworld book has been a part of my life for more than two decades, and in that barrage of material there have been so few disappointments, so many surprises… to come out with a book as fresh and inspired as “Monstrous Regiment” as the 31st novel in your big fantasy series?  Ludicrous.  He was just full of treasure.  What a thing to have had, what a thing to have lost.

In the end, he set a higher standard, as a writer and as a person.  He got better as he learned, and he kept learning, and there was no “too late” or “too hard” or “I can’t be bothered to do the research.”  He just did the work.  I think in his memory the best thing we can do is to roll up our sleeves and do the same.

This post seems to be making the rounds again so here it is on the word blog

GNU Terry Pratchett

Reposted fromlordminx lordminx

October 29 2017

21:39
My friend told me a story he hadn’t told anyone for years. When he used to tell it years ago people would laugh and say, ‘Who’d believe that? How can that be true? That’s daft.’ So he didn’t tell it again for ages. But for some reason, last night, he knew it would be just the kind of story I would love.
 
When he was a kid, he said, they didn’t use the word autism, they just said ‘shy’, or ‘isn’t very good at being around strangers or lots of people.’ But that’s what he was, and is, and he doesn’t mind telling anyone. It’s just a matter of fact with him, and sometimes it makes him sound a little and act different, but that’s okay.
 
Anyway, when he was a kid it was the middle of the 1980s and they were still saying ‘shy’ or ‘withdrawn’ rather than ‘autistic’. He went to London with his mother to see a special screening of a new film he really loved. He must have won a competition or something, I think. Some of the details he can’t quite remember, but he thinks it must have been London they went to, and the film…! Well, the film is one of my all-time favourites, too. It’s a dark, mysterious fantasy movie. Every single frame is crammed with puppets and goblins. There are silly songs and a goblin king who wears clingy silver tights and who kidnaps a baby and this is what kickstarts the whole adventure.
 
It was ‘Labyrinth’, of course, and the star was David Bowie, and he was there to meet the children who had come to see this special screening.
 
‘I met David Bowie once,’ was the thing that my friend said, that caught my attention.
 
‘You did? When was this?’ I was amazed, and surprised, too, at the casual way he brought this revelation out. Almost anyone else I know would have told the tale a million times already.
 
He seemed surprised I would want to know, and he told me the whole thing, all out of order, and I eked the details out of him.
 
He told the story as if it was he’d been on an adventure back then, and he wasn’t quite allowed to tell the story. Like there was a pact, or a magic spell surrounding it. As if something profound and peculiar would occur if he broke the confidence.
 
It was thirty years ago and all us kids who’d loved Labyrinth then, and who still love it now, are all middle-aged. Saddest of all, the Goblin King is dead. Does the magic still exist?
 
I asked him what happened on his adventure.
 
‘I was withdrawn, more withdrawn than the other kids. We all got a signed poster. Because I was so shy, they put me in a separate room, to one side, and so I got to meet him alone. He’d heard I was shy and it was his idea. He spent thirty minutes with me.
 
‘He gave me this mask. This one. Look.
 
‘He said: ‘This is an invisible mask, you see?
 
‘He took it off his own face and looked around like he was scared and uncomfortable all of a sudden. He passed me his invisible mask. ‘Put it on,’ he told me. ‘It’s magic.’
 
‘And so I did.
 
‘Then he told me, ‘I always feel afraid, just the same as you. But I wear this mask every single day. And it doesn’t take the fear away, but it makes it feel a bit better. I feel brave enough then to face the whole world and all the people. And now you will, too.
 
‘I sat there in his magic mask, looking through the eyes at David Bowie and it was true, I did feel better.
 
‘Then I watched as he made another magic mask. He spun it out of thin air, out of nothing at all. He finished it and smiled and then he put it on. And he looked so relieved and pleased. He smiled at me.
 
‘'Now we’ve both got invisible masks. We can both see through them perfectly well and no one would know we’re even wearing them,’ he said.
 
‘So, I felt incredibly comfortable. It was the first time I felt safe in my whole life.
 
‘It was magic. He was a wizard. He was a goblin king, grinning at me.
 
‘I still keep the mask, of course. This is it, now. Look.’
 
I kept asking my friend questions, amazed by his story. I loved it and wanted all the details. How many other kids? Did they have puppets from the film there, as well? What was David Bowie wearing? I imagined him in his lilac suit from Live Aid. Or maybe he was dressed as the Goblin King in lacy ruffles and cobwebs and glitter.
 
What was the last thing he said to you, when you had to say goodbye?
 
‘David Bowie said, ‘I’m always afraid as well. But this is how you can feel brave in the world.’ And then it was over. I’ve never forgotten it. And years later I cried when I heard he had passed.’
 
My friend was surprised I was delighted by this tale.
 
‘The normal reaction is: that’s just a stupid story. Fancy believing in an invisible mask.’
 
But I do. I really believe in it.
 
And it’s the best story I’ve heard all year.
— Paul Magrs (via yourfluffiestnightmare)

October 08 2017

fbr
20:36
Drei beim Sturm Xavier umgestürzte Bäume liegen an einer Straße bei Rautenberg im Landkreis Hildesheim
Reposted fromdingens dingens vianoisetales noisetales

September 24 2017

fbr
21:23
5050 b644 390
Reposted fromJamalus Jamalus viaAndi Andi

August 18 2017

fbr
01:00

August 17 2017

fbr
19:17
Verwechslungsgefahr
Reposted bySkepticalgafRemulanerAndialphabetRekrut-KravenSpinNE555minnavronk

July 27 2017

fbr
21:12
Reposted fromgruetze gruetze vianicapicella nicapicella

July 26 2017

fbr
10:53
think of a browser as a desktop (a literal one). open tabs are papers lying around, bookmarks are papers filed in a nice binder and put in the cabinet.

at some point you have to decide what to do with all that paper lying around, maybe in summer when no other pressing matters are at hand, or when getting to work takes 8 minutes of shuffling papers until you have a small surface to write on.
some of these stacks are just newspapers you have lying around, others are long scientific articles you want to read but don't have the time right now, some are just brochures from when you looked for nice vacation and compared several hotels, but you never got to clean them away because other things were more important, and others just need to be filed away but you didn't get around to it yet.

thats why i have 1611 tabs open.
fbr
10:45
WOW fuckyeah i can't wait for fx55. i currently have 684 in the main tab group and total 1611 tabs!
fbr
10:44

July 12 2017

fbr
21:56
5238 a15c 390
Reposted fromrainy rainy viajustmess justmess

June 25 2017

fbr
21:50
3126 b958 390
Reposted fromzrazik zrazik

June 08 2017

fbr
23:46

Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace.

These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice.

These two men are laying down their lives in mankind’s most noble goal: the search for truth and understanding.

They will be mourned by their families and friends; they will be mourned by their nation; they will be mourned by the people of the world; they will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send two of her sons into the unknown.

In their exploration, they stirred the people of the world to feel as one; in their sacrifice, they bind more tightly the brotherhood of man.

In ancient days, men looked at stars and saw their heroes in the constellations. In modern times, we do much the same, but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood.

Others will follow, and surely find their way home. Man’s search will not be denied. But these men were the first, and they will remain the foremost in our hearts.

For every human being who looks up at the moon in the nights to come will know that there is some corner of another world that is forever mankind.

The Moon Landing: An Undelivered Nixon Speech

Text of William Safire’s speech for President Richard Nixon in the event of a disaster besetting Apollo 11.
Reposted bynaichpanpancernyvolldostKane1337

June 07 2017

fbr
10:51
Reposted fromfungi fungi viajestemzero jestemzero

April 19 2017

13:10
0737 4760 390

lt-rik:

A soldier of East german grenztruppen lights a cigarette at the fall of Berlin wall, 1989-1990.

Reposted frommelanchujnia melanchujnia viafourstrings fourstrings

April 16 2017

fbr
09:04
Reposted fromdarthsadic darthsadic vianinjamonkey ninjamonkey

April 08 2017

fbr
09:11

April 05 2017

fbr
21:06

xg - eyes gaze warping 2

There are 14 Faces to try. Also great: when the eyes are loading slower than the face.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl